Basic CERT Training Class: May 2016

Friday, 6 May, 19:00 – 22:00
Saturday, 7 May, 08:00 – 16:00
Sunday, 8 May, 08:00 – 13:30
Saturday, 21 May, 10:00 – 13:00 (final exercise)

Anne Arundel County Fire Training Academy
415 Maxwell Frye Road
Millersville, MD 21108

Register here

CERT Basic Training is designed to prepare you to help yourself and to help others in the event of a catastrophic disaster. Because emergency services personnel will not be able to help everyone immediately, you can make a difference by using your CERT training to save lives and protect property. This training covers basic skills that are important to know in a disaster when emergency services are not available. With training and practice, and by working as a team, you will be able to protect yourself and do the greatest good for the greatest number after a disaster.

11119770_932574643475239_470837297064966421_o
This could be you! A happy (and well educated) CERT graduate.

The purpose of the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Basic Training is to provide the individuals who complete this course with the basic skills that they will need to respond to their community’s immediate needs in the aftermath of a disaster, when emergency services are not immediately available. By working together, CERT members can assist in saving lives and protecting property using the basic techniques in this course. The target audience for this course is individuals who desire the skills and knowledge required to prepare for and respond to a disaster. Medical or EMT experience is not required.

Fee: $35.00 to cover the cost of the training manual, disposable first aid training supplies, and a CERT backpack.

Lunch: On your own – suggest that you bring a bag lunch however, there are several fast food restaurants nearby.

Attendees are required to attend all sessions to complete the class and obtain a certificate. For questions, please contact training@aaacert.org

Overall Course Objectives
Upon completing this course, the participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the types of hazards that are most likely to affect their homes, workplaces, and neighborhoods.
    2. Take steps to prepare themselves and their families for a disaster.
    3. Describe the functions of CERTs and their role in immediate response.
    4. Identify and reduce potential fire hazards in their homes, workplaces, and neighborhoods.
    5. Work as a team to apply basic fire suppression strategies, resources, and safety measures to extinguish a pan fire.
    6. Apply techniques for opening airways, controlling excessive bleeding, and treating for shock.
    7. Conduct triage under simulated disaster conditions.
    8. Perform head-to-toe patient assessments.
    9. Select and set up a treatment area.
    10.Employ basic treatments for various injuries and apply splints to suspected fractures and sprains.
    11.Identify planning and sizeup requirements for potential search and rescue situations.
    12.Describe the most common techniques for searching a structure.
    13.Work as a team to apply safe techniques for debris removal and victim extrication.
    14.Describe ways to protect rescuers during search and rescue operations.
    15.Describe the post-disaster emotional environment and the steps that rescuers can take to relieve their own stressors and those of disaster survivors.
    16.Describe CERT organization and documentation requirements. In addition to the overall course objectives listed above, each unit has specific objectives.

Course Outline

Unit – 1 Disaster Preparedness
– Introductions and Overview
– Community Preparedness: Roles and Responsibilities
– Hazards and Their Potential Impact
– Impact on the Infrastructure
– Home and Workplace Preparedness
– Reducing the Impact of Hazards Through Mitigation
– CERT Disaster Response
– Protection for Disaster Workers
– Additional Training for CERTs
– Unit Summary

Unit – 2 Fire Safety and Utility Controls
– Introduction and Unit Overview
– Fire Chemistry
– Fire and Utility Hazards
– CERT Sizeup
– Fire Sizeup Considerations
– Firefighting Resources
– Fire Suppression Safety
– Hazardous Materials
– Exercise: Suppressing Small Fires
– Unit Summary

Unit – 3 Disaster Medical Operations — Part 1
– Introduction and Unit Overview
– Treating Life-Threatening Conditions
– Triage
– Unit Summary

Unit – 4 Disaster Medical Operations — Part 2
– Introduction and Unit Overview
– Public Health Considerations
– Functions of Disaster Medical Operations
– Establishing Medical Treatment Areas
– Conducting Head-to-Toe Assessments
– Treating Burns
– Wound Care
– Treating Fractures, Dislocations, Sprains, and Strains
– Nasal Injuries
– Treating Cold-Related Injuries
– Treating Heat-Related Injuries
– Bites and Stings
– Unit Summary

Unit – 5 Light Search and Rescue Operations
– Introduction and Unit Overview
– Safety During Search and Rescue Operations
– Conducting Interior and Exterior Search Operations
– Conducting Rescue Operations
– Unit Summary

Unit – 6 CERT Organization
– Introduction and Unit Overview
– CERT Organization
– CERT Mobilization
– Documentation
– Activity: ICS Functions
– Activity: Tabletop Exercise
– Unit Summary

Unit – 7 Disaster Psychology
– Introduction and Unit Overview
– Disaster Trauma
– Team Well-Being
– Working with Survivors’ Trauma
– Unit Summary

Unit – 8 Terrorism and CERT
– Introduction and Unit Overview
– What Is Terrorism?
– Terrorist Targets
– Terrorist Weapons
– CBRNE Indicators
– Preparing at Home, Work, and in Your Neighborhood
– CERTs and Terrorist Incidents
– Activity: Applying CERT Principles to a Suspected Terrorist Incident
– Unit Summary

Unit – 9 Course Review, Final Exam, and Disaster Simulation
– Introduction and Unit Overview
– Course Review
– Final Exam
– Disaster Simulation
Exercise Critique and Summary

We look forward to having you!

Course dates/times/content subject to change. Changes will be made on this blog post.

Hospital Disaster Preparedness – Are We Really Confident?

Disaster Preparedness – Are We Really Confident?

December 21, 2015 8:46 AM by Silas Gossman

[Editor’s Note: this blog was originally written by Diane Hayes, president and co-founder, InCrowd]

The recent tragic events in Paris, San Bernardino or Colorado Springs lead crisis care teams instinctively to wonder “how would I handle this if it happened at my hospital?”

The answer is concerning. Fully two-thirds of ER and critical care clinicians in the United States said they didn’t feel their hospitals were prepared to handle the victims of the next terrorist attack or other mass casualty event, according to an instant snapshot taken on November 24, 2015, several days after the Paris terrorist events.

The microsurvey, compiled by InCrowd, a provider of real-time market intelligence to life sciences and healthcare firms, asked US ER and critical care physicians and ER and critical care nurses from its Crowd of 1.8 million global clinicians about the operational readiness of their respective hospitals.  Respondents rated readiness on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 and 2 being “I strongly agree” and “I agree” respectively, to their confidence in preparedness, and ranked and rated other key aspects of disaster response.

The findings highlight specific areas of operational readiness where staff harbored concerns:

– Only 32% strongly agreed or agreed that their hospital had adequate staff to mobilize in a similar situation to the attacks that occurred in Paris in November.

– Only 41% strongly agreed or agreed their hospital was ready to respond to the victims of a similar terrorist attacks. Available beds (only 26% believed they were sufficient) and adequate blood supply (only 32%) were the top concerns.

– Surgeon availability is paramount during disasters, yet only half of the respondents felt their facility would have enough surgeons on hand during a mass casualty event. Doctors in particular were concerned about this, with only 33% of them in the survey agreeing or strongly agreeing that their hospital had adequate surgical availability for such an event, compared to 56% of nurses agreeing or strongly agreeing.

– Additional triage staff and additional staff training top the ranks as the most needed elements for hospital readiness, at 30% and 31% respectively. However many polled were undecided about the readiness of resources and needs.

– Only 35% strongly agreed or agreed that their facility would have enough mental health staff available during a terrorist event—despite 42% of nurses agreeing or strongly agreeing that patients who are taken to the ER recently were exhibiting higher anxiety.

The microsurvey included 52 ER physicians and 50 ER nurses who responded in under 2 hours using InCrowd’s real-time platform.

Diane Hayes, PhD is president and co-founder of InCrowd (incrowdnow.com), a real-time market intelligence solution for the life sciences.

Reposted from: Advance Healthcare Network

Tuning in for Tornadoes

Tuning in for Tornadoes

Tornadoes are one of nature’s most violent storms and can cause death, injury, and destruction within seconds. Having advanced notice that a tornado isapproaching your area can give you the critical time needed to move to a safeplace for protection. Before severe weather strikes, pay attention to weather reports and be sure to sign up for text alerts and download smart phone apps that provide weather warnings.

Whileyou may not always receive an official tornado alert in your area, there arewarning signs that can indicate a tornado is near. Page four of the How to Prepare for a Tornado guide from America’s PrepareAthon! highlights these signs, including:

  • A change in the color of the sky;
  • An approaching cloud of debris;
  • A strange quiet occurring within or shortly after a thunderstorm; or
  • A loud roar that sounds similar to a freight train.

Ifyou experience these signs, take action immediately and go to the safest placefor protection such as a FEMA saferoom or InternationalCode Council 500 storm shelter. If you do not have access to one of these structures, move to a small, interior, windowless room such as a closet or bathroom, on the lowest level of your building and cover your head and neck with your arms.