Hospital Disaster Preparedness – Are We Really Confident?

Disaster Preparedness – Are We Really Confident?

December 21, 2015 8:46 AM by Silas Gossman

[Editor’s Note: this blog was originally written by Diane Hayes, president and co-founder, InCrowd]

The recent tragic events in Paris, San Bernardino or Colorado Springs lead crisis care teams instinctively to wonder “how would I handle this if it happened at my hospital?”

The answer is concerning. Fully two-thirds of ER and critical care clinicians in the United States said they didn’t feel their hospitals were prepared to handle the victims of the next terrorist attack or other mass casualty event, according to an instant snapshot taken on November 24, 2015, several days after the Paris terrorist events.

The microsurvey, compiled by InCrowd, a provider of real-time market intelligence to life sciences and healthcare firms, asked US ER and critical care physicians and ER and critical care nurses from its Crowd of 1.8 million global clinicians about the operational readiness of their respective hospitals.  Respondents rated readiness on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 and 2 being “I strongly agree” and “I agree” respectively, to their confidence in preparedness, and ranked and rated other key aspects of disaster response.

The findings highlight specific areas of operational readiness where staff harbored concerns:

– Only 32% strongly agreed or agreed that their hospital had adequate staff to mobilize in a similar situation to the attacks that occurred in Paris in November.

– Only 41% strongly agreed or agreed their hospital was ready to respond to the victims of a similar terrorist attacks. Available beds (only 26% believed they were sufficient) and adequate blood supply (only 32%) were the top concerns.

– Surgeon availability is paramount during disasters, yet only half of the respondents felt their facility would have enough surgeons on hand during a mass casualty event. Doctors in particular were concerned about this, with only 33% of them in the survey agreeing or strongly agreeing that their hospital had adequate surgical availability for such an event, compared to 56% of nurses agreeing or strongly agreeing.

– Additional triage staff and additional staff training top the ranks as the most needed elements for hospital readiness, at 30% and 31% respectively. However many polled were undecided about the readiness of resources and needs.

– Only 35% strongly agreed or agreed that their facility would have enough mental health staff available during a terrorist event—despite 42% of nurses agreeing or strongly agreeing that patients who are taken to the ER recently were exhibiting higher anxiety.

The microsurvey included 52 ER physicians and 50 ER nurses who responded in under 2 hours using InCrowd’s real-time platform.

Diane Hayes, PhD is president and co-founder of InCrowd (incrowdnow.com), a real-time market intelligence solution for the life sciences.

Reposted from: Advance Healthcare Network

Man vs. Machinery Incidents: Are You Prepared? – Webinar

Although CERT isn’t directly involved with response this still may be a seminar of interest and benefit.

Man vs. Machinery Incidents: Are You Prepared?
Date: December 29, 2015
Time: 3:00 PM EST / 2:00 PM CST / 12:00 PM PST / 8:00 PM GMT

Event Description:
A variety of machinery-entrapment situations are presented. Students learn how to effectively operate at these incidents from scene size-up until the disentanglement is complete. The focus is on looking at the big picture to realizing that not all disentanglements need to be complex. Lock-out/tag-out, equipment options, medical considerations, and actual incidents are discussed.

REGISTER

CERT Instructors Graduate the Train the Trainer Program

 

Graduating class of CERT Train the Trainer at the Anne Arundel County Fire Training Academy, 20 December 2015. Anne Arundel - Annapolis CERT sponsored a CERT Train the Trainer course to prepare participants to teach the Basic CERT course. The three day class, taugh by Chief Michael O'Connell, was held at the Anne Arundel County Fire Training Academy in Millersville, Maryland. Pictured left to right: Paula Hughes (Clinton CERT - Prince George's County), Bruce Morgenstern, Carlos Gonzales, Chief Michael O'Connell (Division Chief AAFD / Director, Anne Arundel County Office of Emergency Management), John Schirrippa, Mona Grupp, Rick Cooper, Paul Bowling (not-pictured).
Graduating class of CERT Train the Trainer at the Anne Arundel County Fire Training Academy, 20 December 2015.
Pictured left to right: Paula Hughes (Clinton CERT – Prince George’s County), Bruce Morgenstern, Carlos Gonzales, Chief Michael O’Connell (Division Chief AAFD / Director, Anne Arundel County Office of Emergency Management), John Schirrippa, Mona Grupp, Rick Cooper, Paul Bowling (not-pictured).

Anne Arundel – Annapolis CERT sponsored a CERT Train the Trainer course to prepare participants to teach the Basic CERT course. The three day class, taught by Chief Michael O’Connell, was held at the Anne Arundel County Fire Training Academy in Millersville, Maryland.
The seven new instructors brings the Anne Arundel – Annapolis CERT Basic Instructor cadre to sixteen. We are looking forwarding to providing more Basic CERT classes in 2016.

Skywarn Basic Spotter Class

Anne Arundel – Annapolis CERT and the Anne Arundel County Office of Emergency Management is sponsoring a Skywarn Basic Spotter Class. This class will be presented by professional Meteorologist from the National Weather Service from Sterling Virginia.

This course is a prerequisite for all other courses. Basics I is a good general overview of what it means to be a spotter as well as the basics of the different weather phenomenon that impacts the Mid-Atlantic. Upon completion of the course, you will be registered in the program by the NWS. You will receive a spotter code from the NWS within 6 weeks. Training in Basics I includes:

  • The basic organization of the National Weather Service
  • The role and importance of the Skywarn spotter
  • How to report vital info to the NWS
  • NWS Products and the Watch/Warning/Advisory system
  • Thunderstorm, Flooding, Tropical and Winter Weather Threats
  • The role of amateur short-wave (HAM) radio in the Spotter Program

Date: 2016 January 21
Time: 1900 – 2200 (3 hours)
Location:
Anne Arundel County Office of Emergency Management
7480 Baltimore Annapolis Blvd.
Glen Burnie, MD 21061

REGISTER